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#ID: earthsays

Walking around the most outstanding and amazing places in the world. Interesting facts about the...

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#earthsays-153
                    The sunrise is peeking through!🌤💛MOUNT MAUNGANUI
                
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                    ​​Tulum 🌴☀️
                
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                    ​​Base Jumping off of Kjerag, Norway! 
Base Jumping is the Process of Jumping off a certain structure or cliff via Parachute or Wingsuit Glider, and is incredibly dangerous due to the fact that you are at very low altitudes when doing so!
                
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                    ​​A tiring hike through the deep jungle of Java, paid off with the beauty of this incredible waterfall ! 🇮🇩🌱
                
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                    ​​Siargao is a beautiful tear-drop shaped island in the Philippine Sea situated 800 kilometers southeast of Manila ! 🌴🇵🇭
                
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                    ​​The Greeks called it Persepolis, today it is Takht-e Jamshid; but to its ancient Persian builders, so central was it their idea of who they were, they called it simply Pārsa, which means "The City of Persians". Built by the founding fathers of the great Persian dynasty; Cyrus, Darius and Xerxes in the 5th century BCE, it is thought the city was uninhabited for most of the year but occupied for the Nowruz new year celebrations in the spring and served as a platform to project the Persian empire's wealth and brilliance and to receive tribute from the subject nations of the Empire. None of this however was enough to protect it when Alexander the Great burned the city to the ground in 330 BCE. It is not clear if it was a deliberate act of revenge for the burning of the Acropolis of Athens during the Second Hellenic-Persian War or, perhaps, the consequences of a colossal victory party.
                
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                    ROME ❤️
                
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                    ​​Tour Eiffel
Paris 
France 🇫🇷
                
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                    It is interesting
                
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                    ​​Ruins of Petra, Jordan

Camels in the doorway of the Treasury at Petra, Jordan, shows the enormity of the ancient building's entrance. Carved into the sandstone hill by the Nabataeans in the second century A.D., this towering structure likely began as a temple.

Petra, originally known to its inhabitants as Raqmu, is a historical and archaeological city in southern Jordan. Petra lies on the slope of Jabal Al-Madbah in a basin among the mountains which form the eastern flank of Arabah valley that run from the Dead Sea to the Gulf of Aqaba. Petra is believed to have been settled as early as 9,000 BC, and it was possibly established in the 4th century BC as the capital city of the Nabataean Kingdom. The Nabataeans were nomadic Arabs who invested in Petra's proximity to the trade routes by establishing it as a major regional trading hub.
                
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                    ​​Leaning Tower
Pisa, Italy 🇮🇹
                
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                    ​​Mariana Trench

The Mariana Trench is named for the nearby Mariana Islands (in turn named Las Marianas in honor of Spanish Queen Mariana of Austria, widow of Philip IV of Spain). The islands are part of the island arc that is formed on an over-riding plate, called the Mariana Plate (also named for the islands), on the western side of the trench.
                
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                    ​​Stonehenge

Archaeologists believe it was constructed from 3000 BC to 2000 BC. The surrounding circular earth bank and ditch, which constitute the earliest phase of the monument, have been dated to about 3100 BC. Radiocarbon dating suggests that the first bluestones were raised between 2400 and 2200 BC,although they may have been at the site as early as 3000 BC.

One of the most famous landmarks in the United Kingdom, Stonehenge is regarded as a British cultural icon. It has been a legally protected Scheduled Ancient Monument since 1882 when legislation to protect historic monuments was first successfully introduced in Britain. The site and its surroundings were added to UNESCO's list of World Heritage Sites in 1986. Stonehenge is owned by the Crown and managed by English Heritage; the surrounding land is owned by the National Trust.

Stonehenge could have been a burial ground from its earliest beginnings. Deposits containing human bone date from as early as 3000 BC, when the ditch and bank were first dug, and continued for at least another five hundred years.
                
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                    ​​Colosseum, Rome

The Colosseum or Coliseum , also known as the Flavian Amphitheatre , is an oval amphitheatre in the centre of the city of Rome, Italy. Built of travertine, tuff, and brick-faced concrete, it is the largest amphitheatre ever built. The Colosseum is situated just east of the Roman Forum. Construction began under the emperor Vespasian in AD 72, and was completed in AD 80 under his successor and heir Titus. Further modifications were made during the reign of Domitian (81–96). These three emperors are known as the Flavian dynasty, and the amphitheatre was named in Latin for its association with their family name (Flavius).

Although partially ruined because of damage caused by earthquakes and stone-robbers, the Colosseum is still an iconic symbol of Imperial Rome and is listed as one of the New7Wonders of the World. It is one of Rome's most popular tourist attractions and also has links to the Roman Catholic Church, as each Good Friday the Pope leads a torchlit "Way of the Cross" procession that starts in the area around the Colosseum.
                
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                    ​​Acropolis, Greece

The Acropolis of Athens is an ancient citadel located on a rocky outcrop above the city of Athens and contains the remains of several ancient buildings of great architectural and historic significance, the most famous being the Parthenon. The word acropolis is from the Greek words ἄκρον (akron, "highest point, extremity") and πόλις (polis, "city"). Although the term acropolis is generic and there are many other acropoleis in Greece, the significance of the Acropolis of Athens is such that it is commonly known as "The Acropolis" without qualification. During ancient times it was known also more properly as Cecropia, after the legendary serpent-man, Cecrops, the first Athenian king.
                
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                    ​​Victoria Falls at the junction of Zimbabwe and Zambia
                
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                    ​​Pamukkale, meaning "cotton castle" in Turkish, is a natural site in Denizli in southwestern Turkey. The area is famous for a carbonate mineral left by the flowing water. It is located in Turkey's Inner Aegean region, in the River Menderes valley, which has a temperate climate for most of the year.

Known as Pamukkale (Cotton Castle) or ancient Hierapolis (Holy City), this area has been drawing the weary to its thermal springs since the time of Classical antiquity. The Turkish name refers to the surface of the shimmering, snow-white limestone, shaped over millennia by calcium-rich springs. Dripping slowly down the vast mountainside, mineral-rich waters foam and collect in terraces, spilling over cascades of stalactites into milky pools below. Legend has it that the formations are solidified cotton (the area’s principal crop) that giants left out to dry.
                
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                    ​​Yellowstone National Park is an American national park located in Wyoming, Montana, and Idaho. It was established by the U.S. Congress and signed into law by President Ulysses S. Grant on March 1, 1872.Yellowstone was the first national park in the U.S. and is also widely held to be the first national park in the world. The park is known for its wildlife and its many geothermal features, especially Old Faithful geyser, one of its most popular features. It has many types of ecosystems, but the subalpine forest is the most abundant. It is part of the South Central Rockies forests ecoregion.